Biographies of silver makers

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The biographies which follow have been expanded beyond the usual range of goldsmiths normally given in such accounts, to include those men, predominantly retailers, who seem likely to have overmarked imported goods, but whose marks have not been reported. In most instances, they would not have been observed, because they would normally have been overstruck on the marks of the makers of Victorian or Edwardian spoons and forks imported from England.

A 1784 christening cup bearing London hallmarks and overmarked by Jean-Pierre du Port of Guernsey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £600

Overmarks

Little attention is usually paid to these, either by collectors or dealers, and to be sure of a Channel Islands overmark it is necessary to know the initials and shape of mark of the silver cutlery makers registered at London, Exeter, and Sheffield, and preferably also Birmingham and Chester. Unless the collector knows, for instance, that nobody with the initials JPG was ever registered at Exeter, a spoon with this mark and Exeter hallmarks is unlikely to be associated with J Pope Genge of Jersey.

However, most of the overmarking took place in the 19th century, and much of the overmarked silver was embellished with bright-cut engraving of types seldom if ever used in England, whose presence should cause a collector to examine closely the maker's mark on any such piece.

The biographies also include watchmakers known to have worked before 1870, the assumption being that readers might need to date gold and silver-cased watches bearing the names of local men, which appear on the dials and sometimes also on the movements of watches. The watch was doubtless introduced into the Channel Islands in that same 17th century period of prosperity which saw the settlement of both Huguenot and Southampton silversmiths.

No domestic clocks are thought to have been made in the islands before about 1690, when the Huguenot watchmaker Abraham la Feuille made one in Jersey. They may first have been made in Guernsey by a French clockmaker employed by Nicholas Blondell circa 1719, and by Michel Hopin at about the same time. The first local watches may also have been made then.

Watch cases

Making the case for a watch is a skilled goldsmithing job, of which not all watchmakers were capable. They therefore frequently obtained the cases from elsewhere, sometimes from men who made nothing but watchcases. An example of this is a verge watch by Chevalier of Jersey, in a London hall-marked silver case of 1800. Later examples are those gold and silver-cased watches with Swiss cylinder escapements which were signed by le Lacheur & Lenfeszty of Guernsey, despite their having no involvement in their manufacture.

Not only gold and silver were used for watchcases: silver-mounted tortoiseshell in particular was popular in the 18th century. The island watchmakers, and the island goldsmiths who retailed silver-mounted tortoiseshell boxes, may have obtained these from Thomas Harris of Salisbury, who in 1783 advertised himself as the only manufacturer of such wares in England, as indeed, west of London, he may have been. No overmarked silver or gold watchcases have been reported, but some may yet come to light. A further reason for including watchmakers is that during the 18th and 19th centuries, they are known to have done some goldsmithing work, Jersey examples being the Kirbys and the Poignands, of whom a very few silver spoons are known. In addition to watches, the watchmaker would commonly sell spectacles, often with silver frames, and other optical instruments, and the small gold and silver articles considered the necessary accoutrements of the gentleman, in particular watch chains, fob seals, and signet rings.

He would also undertake engraving work, since he had to engrave some watch and clock dials and watchcases. It may be that much of the engraving on the later church silver was done by the clock makers. There is usually no record of this, an exception being Joseph Miles of Shaftesbury, who engraved inscriptions on several pieces of church silver in Dorset in 1782-1793. This combination of trades has persisted until quite recent times and some watchmakers still advertise engraving, although it is more likely to be done with an electric machine than by hand.

An idea of the range of skills once required of a watchmaker goldsmith may be had from the accounts of a Somerset doctor of 1703-1723. His man at Wells was not only called upon to repair his watches and clocks, but to supply him with silver clasps to his garters, a silver chain to his watch, gold studs, a silver-handled toothbrush, a tortoiseshell snuff-box with a looking-glass in its lid to carry testaceous powder in, and a silver ladle, in addition to which he was paid for soldring in the bottom of my ink-box, and for beating out a silver Spoon thrown into the Wash Tub and carried to the Piggs and subsequently gnawed by them. There seems little doubt that the Channel Island watchmaker goldsmith would have been entrusted with commensurate tasks.

The connection between clockmakers and goldsmiths is in fact far more remote in time than is generally supposed, though both disciplines call for the accurate manipulation of small pieces of metal.

One of the earliest such examples in south west England is at Glastonbury Abbey, where one William the Goldsmith was employed in 1252-1267 to repair silver cups and the clock. This is not to suggest that all the men employed to work on clocks were either goldsmiths or even particularly skilled. Martinle Breton and Jean Jaquet employed in 1597 and 1614 respectively to maintain the St Helier town clock, were probably simply smiths, responsible for winding it, and capable only of the basic blacksmithing work occasionally required to keep a turret clock running in days when almost nobody had watches.

The watches that did exist were far from reliable, and a clock merely told the passing of the local hours, the nearest other clock being many miles away, and showing a different local time. Such appointments are found in the records of many English and French towns, one of the earliest being at Salisbury in 1386, when a Reginald Glover and Alice his wife were granted a shop with its appurtenances, ...the shop having been ordained and assigned for the maintainance of a certain clock in the said close. By the later 19th century such appointments were often awarded to the goldsmith clockmakers who had supplied more modern clocks. A late exponent of this was Miss Le Page (descendant and heiress of the Guernsey goldsmith Jean le Page) who died at the age of 90 soon after the German Occupation. Her family supplied the wall clock at the Greffe and the turret clocks at St Peter Port church and St Martin's, and she continued to wind and maintain these clocks until the last years of her life, staying up twice a year until 2 am to put them back or forward an hour at the changes from and to British Summer Time. These simple virtues died with her, and the St Peter Port church clock is now electric.

Makers’ biographies

(Note: Surnames beginning with de; l’; Le, La etc are listed under the first letter of the main part of the name: eg Le Blanc will be found under ‘B’)


A c1750 porringer or loving cup by Pierre Amiraux I or II of Jersey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £4,560

A

  • ALLEN, J.G. Guernsey. A goldsmith, jeweller, and watch and clock maker working in 1824-1874, his business presumably being largely retail. He is perhaps connected with Peter Allen, watchmaker of South Moulton, Devon, who was apprenticed to John Potter of the same town in 1758, and who died in 1799.
  • ALLPORT, Simon. Hill Street in 1843 and Colomberie 1852, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. He was born in 1803 in Franfurt, Germany and in 1827 married Mary Walters of St Helier.
  • ALLPORT, Abraham. 5 Parade, St Helier, Jersey. Listed as a watchmaker in the Jersey Almanac 1868. He was born in St Helier in 1836.
  • AMIRAUX, Pierre de la Galaire dit. Jersey. A Huguenot refugee from Saumur, this man abjured at St Helier in 1719, marrying Marie Tifneau, also of Saumur. Their son Pierre II was born in 1726. The existence of trefid spoons bearing what appears to be his mark, and dated 1696 and 1700, suggests that he arrived in Jersey in the mainstream of refugees of the 1680s.
  • AMIRAUX, Pierre II. Jersey. Son of Pierre de la Galaire and Marie Tifnau, born 1726. Assuming apprenticeship to his father at 14, he may have started work circa 1747. He married Elizabeth Godfray in 1759. Their daughter Elizabeth married Louis Poignand, qv A further daughter, Delicia, married David Poignand, watchmaker, in 1764, and they emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1787. Elizabeth Godfray died in 1767, and Pierre married Jeanne Canivet in 1770, their son Pierre III being born in 1772. Jeanne Canivet presumably died, for in 1782 he married Elizabeth Sohier. A lieutenant of the East Regiment of the Jersey Militia, he became Adjutant in 1778. He owned a privateer, The Revenge, in 1781, and was surveyor to the Parish of St Helier in 1791. He died in 1808.
  • AMIRAUX, Pierre III. Jersey. Son of Pierre II and Jeanne Canivet, born in 1779. Assuming apprenticeship to his father at the age of 14, he may have started work in 1800, and perhaps inherited the family business in 1808. He was involved in banking about 1817 with a Mr Le Breton, trading until 1832 as Amiraux, Le Breton and Co.
  • ANDERSON, James. Cattle Street, St Helier, Jersey. A goldsmith, jeweller and watch and clock maker who traded in 1832-1852, probably largely as a retailer, but may have overmarked imported goods. He is conceivably connected with Robert Anderson, watchmaker of Poole, Dorset, 1890-1895.
  • d'ARGENT, Isaac. Jersey. A Hugeunot refugee from Orleans, his wife Marie abjured at St Helier in 1727. She died in 1745. Dated christening cups of 1685 and 1734, and a trefid spoon of 1744, which bear an IA mark, may be by him. Jacques d’Argent of Sancerre, Berri, was a clockmaker in London 1695-1718.
  • ARNELL, William. Guernsey. This man is only known from entries of 1755 and 1756 in the Allès Diary, which show him to have been associated in some way with Pierre Maingy, though whether as a goldsmith is questionable. A goldsmithing family of this name is known in London in 1734-1780.
  • AUBIN, Edward. Jersey. He is only known from an advertisement of 1788, which shows him to have imported from England a quantity of small silverware, which he retailed in St Helier.
  • AUBIN, Henri. London. Son of Abraham Aubin, merchant of Jersey, born circa 1676 and apprenticed to Edward Blagrave of London. Free of his apprenticeship in 1699. He entered his marks at Goldsmiths' Hall, London in 1700 and 1716 as a largeworker. In 1716 he took apprentice Abraham la Feuille, qv, possibly his nephew. There is no evidence of any return to Jersey.
  • AUBIN, Pierre. Jersey. Marks ascribed in older works to a man of this name are now given to Pierre Amiraux, qv.
A c1700 porringer or loving cup by Robert Barbedor of Guernsey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £2,880

B

  • BARBEDOR, Robert. Jersey and Guernsey. Probably the son of Robert Barbedor, goldsmith of Paris, known circa 1640-1680, whose mark he uses. He may have moved to Jersey before his father’s death in 1680, and was still working in 1704.
  • Le BAYLLYF, Jean. Jersey. The son of Jean le Bayllyf, grandson of Philippe le Bayllyf, born in 1618. Presumed to have been apprenticed locally, and is known to have been working by 1638, when he supplied communion cups, since lost, to St Saviour's Church. A centenier of St Helier in 1655-1660, he died in 1674.
  • de BEAUVOIR, Pierre. London. The son of Henry de Beauvoir, of St Peter Port, born circa 1584, apparently apprenticed in London circa 1598, and free of his apprenticeship in 1605. His subsequent fate is unknown, but the existence of a Richard Beauvoir or Beaver, jeweller, in London in 1690-1703 may suggest that he remained in England.
  • BENSA, George. Old Street, St Helier, Jersey. Born in Jersey in 1823 the son of Louis Bensa. A goldsmith, jeweller and watchmaker, he was taken into partnership by James Smith, qv, in 1845, and bought him out by 1852, apparently being succeeded in business by his widow, Mrs. Georgina Bensa, between 1891 and 1901. The business was doubtless largely retail, but imported goods may have been overmarked.
  • BERTRAM, Francis P. Broad Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed as a watchmaker and silversmith in the Jersey Almanac of 1856 moving to 7 Don Street by 1852 and 25 Halkett Place by 1868. He was born in 1830 in Jersey.
  • BISHOP, Abraham, and de JERSEY, Henry. Guernsey. These men were linen drapers and bankers with extensive mercantile interests. They dissolved their partnership with Philip Tyson le Gros in 1804, and commenced trading as Bishop, de Jersey & Co., and the Bank of Guernsey. Abraham Bishop was Henry de Jersey's son-in-law. In 1809 they ordered a quantity of Spanish pillar dollars to be overstruck to their own design, as five shilling pieces, from Boulton & Watt of Birmingham. These were declared illegal in the same year. It is conceivable that they were involved in the importation of English silverware, as were some of their counterparts in Jersey, and that they had other dealings with Boulton & Watt.
  • BISSON, Winter T. Jersey. A retail jeweller and watch and clock repairer trading in 1894-1924, he may have overmarked imported goods.
  • le BLANC, Mr. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1839.
  • BLONDELL, Nicholas. Guernsey. Son of Nicholas Blondell, clockmaker, born circa 1699. He was presumably apprenticed to his father, and established himself in business in 1719 as a clockmaker and maker of spoons and buckles, perhaps of brass. He was dead by 1776, and was succeeded in business by his daughter Elizabeth Naftel, qv., and her sons Thomas Andrew and Nicholas Andrew Naftel, qv. His mark NBD is only known from a clock-weight.
  • BODILLY, Nicholas. Guernsey. A watchmaker recorded in 1821, when his daughter Lucretia was born.
  • BOLT, Frederick R. Guernsey. A jeweller and watch and clock maker trading in 1858-1874, he may be connected with Richard Bolt, watch and clockmaker of Teignmouth, Devon, known 1830-1856. The family continued to trade in Teignmouth and Dawlish into the present century.
  • BOUCHER, Pierre. Jersey? A Huguenot goldsmith of Angers, he was dead by 1687 when his daughter Suzanne abjured at St Helier, and it is probable that he had accompanied her to Jersey.
  • BOUTON, Thomas. Jersey. Known to have been working circa 1770.
  • BOWRING, George. 26 Halkett Place, St Helier, Jersey. Born in St Helier in 1826 the son of George Bowring and Elizabeth Aubin. A goldsmith and jeweller working in 1868, succeeded in business in 1884 by his brother-in-law J Pope Genge, qv, who was himself succeeded by Albert E Edgar, qv . Since both these men are known to have overstruck their marks over those of the makers of imported silver, it is possible that Bowring had done the same. He may possibly be connected with Benjamin Bowring, goldsmith, jeweller and watchmaker of Exeter and St John's, Newfoundland, 1776-1846, the ancestor of CT Bowring & Company Limited, the international insurance and banking group.
A c1775 cream jug marked LC (possibly Chevalier of Jersey). Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £2,040

C

  • CACHART, Peter Elias, Guernsey, Paris and Pondicherry, India. Born in Guernsey, he was presumably apprenticed in Paris since he is later described as bourgeois de Paris, though where he worked is unknown until 1751, by which date he was established at Pondicherry, having 7 children there by 1760, after which date he is unrecorded. He might be the son or younger brother of Elias Cachart, known 1742-1752, a London goldsmith specialising in spoons and forks, whose origins and apprenticeship are unrecorded and who might likewise have been born in Guernsey. The Cacharts continued in Pondicherry until 1786, most moving to Madras, where they worked in 1772-1861, though contact was maintained with Europe, Gabriel II of Pondicherry and Madras, d.1787, being born in London.
  • CALBRIS George. 4 Bath Street, St Helier, Jersey. Born in France in 1817, he is known to have worked as a watchmaker 1861-1874.
  • CARMALT, J. Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have been working in 1852.
  • CARTAULT, Thomas. Jersey. Son of Thomas Cartault originally from Dieppe and later Rector of Trinity, and Judith Pipon (died 1729/30), born in 1704 or shortly thereafter. He was probably apprenticed locally, and may have established himself circa 1725. He died in 1736. Some connection with the Hébert family, qv., is suggested by a Jeanne Cartault, widow of Pierre Hébert, goldsmith of Dieppe, who continued his business there in 1670. Cartault was also the maiden name of the mother of Moise Hébert, also a goldsmith of Dieppe, working in 1683.
  • CARVER. King Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1856 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker.
  • CHEVALIER, Mr. Jersey. A watchmaker, only known from his name engraved on the movement of a verge watch whose case bears London hallmarks for 1800. He is conceivably either the goldsmith LC, of whom dated pieces are a spoon of 1798 and a masonic medal of 1801, or the goldsmith JC of whom a teapot and stand of circa 1780-1790 are known. The latter is perhaps the most likely, since the mark is incuse, and incuse marks were frequently used by watchmakers. This is not to suggest that Chevalier definitely made the teapot and stand, for he may simply have retailed them.
  • COHU, Alfred. Guernsey. A working jeweller, engraver, and watch and clockmaker, known 1858-1874.
  • COLLENETTE, Mrs M. Jersey. A goldsmith, jeweller and watch and clockmaker, she traded in 1852, probably as a retailer only, but may have overmarked imported goods. A John Collennett was a clockmaker in Guernsey c.1820-1830 and there may be some connection. This is reinforced as a jeweller, Joseph Collenette born in 1841 in Guernsey is listed in the Jersey census of 1861.
  • COQUEREL, Thomas. Guernsey. The son of Pierre Coquerel, merchant grocer of London, he was perhaps apprenticed there, and was a goldsmith when he died in London, in or before 1539. A deed registered at the Cour Royale in 1561 suggests that he had at some time worked in Guernsey, and shows some of his goods to have been returned to his heirs there. That he may also have worked in Flanders, or at least have traded with the Flemish mercantile community in London, is suggested by the inclusion in his effects of two armorial rings venus de Flandres, and also a large quantity of Flemish ironware, fer de flandres, which may have consisted of cast-iron cooking pots and the like.
  • CONSTANCE, Mr. Charing Cross, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have been working in 1845.
  • COVENTRY, Henry. Guernsey. A goldsmith and watchmaker trading in 1874, probably as a retailer only.
A c1740 porringer or loving cup by Philippe Le Vavasseur dit Durell. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £4,200

D

  • DAMER. John. Royal Square, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 and 1868 Jersey Almanacs as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Born 1801 in St Helier he is listed in the Jersey census of 1861 as a watchmaker and hotel proprietor. His sons John born 1833 and William H, born 1835 are also listed in 1861 as watchmakers. William H Damer is listed as a watch and clock maker in Royal Square, St Helier in 1875.
  • DURREL, W. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1852.
  • DURELL, Philippe le Vavasseur dit. Jersey. Probably son of Thomas le Vavasseur dit Durell, qv., born before 1680 and perhaps apprenticed to him. He appears to have still been working in 1743.
  • DURELL, Thomas le Vavasseur dit. Jersey. Son of Thomas le Vavasseur of St Helier by his first(?) wife, born 1613. Presumably apprenticed locally, and may have established himself by 1634. He was still working in 1677, when he supplied a platter now at St John's Church. He died in 1680. He is possibly connected with Richard Vavasor, goldsmith of Totnes, Devon, 1705-1715, and with Jean-Louis Durel, goldsmith of Granville, 1750-1754.

E

  • EDGAR, Albert E. Library Place, St Helier, Jersey. Born in England in 1829. A working jeweller, goldsmith and watchmaker, initially employed by John le Gallais, qv., leaving that firm and establishing his own by 1874. He bought out J Pope Genge in 1899, and appears to have retired circa 1905, the business passing to his sons Alfred E Edgar, qv., and CW Edgar. He continued with John le Gallais' and J Pope Genge's practice of overstriking his own mark over the maker's marks on older local silver and imported silverwares and gold wedding rings. A Sylvester Edgar, born at Crewkerne, Somerset, in 1827, and trading as a watch and clockmaker and gunsmith at Gillingham, Dorset, in 1851-1890, may be connected.
  • EDGAR, Alfred E. Jersey. Son of Albert E.Edgar, he was taken into partnership by his father circa 1888, and had set himself up in business by 1901. He is last recorded in 1905. His initials being the same as his father's, there is no way of determining whether or not he continued with the practice of overstriking his mark on goods made by others.
  • EZEKIEL, Henry. Guernsey. Son of Abraham Ezekiel I, goldsmith of Exeter, born 1772. His apprenticeship is unrecorded, but his brother Ezekiel Abraham Ezekiel was apprenticed to Alexander Jenkins of Exeter, and it seems likely that he was also apprenticed there, becoming free circa 1793. He is known to have been established in Guernsey by 1806, when his brother died, and Guernsey longcase clocks apparently of circa 1820-1830, with his name on their dials as retailer, show that he was there then. He had returned to Exeter by 1835, when he died. His sister Anne married Benjamin Jonas, goldsmith of Devonport, known 1806-1814, and a nephew may be Benjamin Jonas, watchmaker of Teignmouth, known 1823-1830.

F

  • FARR, George. Jersey. A watchmaker known to have been working in 1786, he also kept an inn at St Aubin. He may have been one of the numerous Farr family of goldsmiths and watchmakers working in Bristol, Boston and Philadelphia, 1780-1855.
  • La FEUILLE, Abraham. London. Son of Henri la Feuille, qv, and Marguerite Aubin, sister of Henry Aubin, qv, born circa 1702. He was apprenticed in 1716 to Henry Aubin, goldsmith of London, but is not recorded to have become free of his apprenticeship. No further record of him has been found.
  • La FEUILLE, Henry. Jersey. Born circa 1670, this Huguenot watchmaker was established in Jersey by 1690, when he made a long-case clock still on the island. He married Marguerite Aubin, perhaps sister of Henry Aubin, qv., their son being Abraham la Feuille, qv.
  • Le FEUVRE, F. High Street, St Aubin, Jersey. Listed in the 1845 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Possibly the son of F.L. Le Feuvre a clockmaker 1n 1770-1790 and perhaps related to George Le Feuvre a banker in Jersey 1817-1820.
  • Le FORTIER, J. Halkett Place, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 and 1845 Jersey Almanacs as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. An Augustus Le Fortier is listed as a clockmaker at 17 King Street in 1834, 7 King Street in 1837 and Halkett Place 1845.
  • FRIEND, W. Mount Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have been working in 1845-1852, he may be the Walter Friend known at Holsworthy in 1823 and Newton Abbot in 1829, who is likely to have been related to the watchmakers John Walter Friend of Totnes in 1830 and Lyme Regis in 1842, and Robert Friend of Totnes, 1832-1840
  • FRYTH, John. Jersey. A goldsmith of London, he accompanied John Nanfan to Jersey on his appointment as warden in 1452, with other London merchants. No further record of him has been found, and it may be that his intentions in Jersey were mercantile, for a number of London goldsmiths of this period had other interests which were frequently extensive.
  • FURZER. 23 Hue Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed as a silversmith in the Jersey Almanac of 1888. This man is probably the Charles Furzer born in 1836 in England listed in the 1861 Jersey census.
A c1750 beaker by Jean Gavey of Jersey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £1,800

G

  • de la GALAIRE : See AMIRAUX, Pierre de la Galaire dit.
  • GALE, G. 18 Union Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1868 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Possibly an antecedent of the Devon and Dorset family of Silversmiths and jewellers who traded as Gales from 1897-1932.
John Le Gallais
  • Le GALLAIS, John. Broad Street, St helier, Jersey. A goldsmith, jeweller, watch and clockmaker, he is first recorded in partnership with Thomas de Gruchy, qv., in 1831, and had perhaps been his apprentice. He acquired de Gruchy's share of the business on his death in 1846, and continued with it until 1874 when he sold out to H Holinshed, qv. He is possibly connected with Nicholas le Gallais, goldsmith of Granville, 1751-1787. A prolific maker of spoons and overmarker of those made by others, his best known product is a medallion struck to commemorate the royal visit of 1846. Other members of his family are found in banking 1817-1846. William George Le Gallais trading as The Jersey Bank 1843-1846
  • GALLICHAN, Matthieu. Jersey. Known in 1790 when he advertised that he would sell by auction at The Duke of York silver chandeliers, coffee-pots and other articles, presumably imported from England for the purpose. He was perhaps an antecedent of John and Edward John Gallichan, qv . A Matthieu Gallichan, a banker trading in 1817, may be either this man or his son.
  • GALLICHAN, Edward John. 16 Royal Square, St helier, Jersey. Goldsmith, jeweller and watch-maker, the son of John Gallichan, qv, succeeding him by 1894. The firm overmarked imported goods, and is still trading.
  • GALLICHAN, John. Royal Square, St Helier, Jersey. Born in Jersey in 1827. A jeweller and watchmaker, known to have traded in 1852-1874. Father of Edward John Gallichan, qv. May have overmarked imported goods.
  • GAVEY, Edouard. Jersey? Son of Jean Gavey, qv., perhaps born circa 1734. He may have been apprenticed in London, and was working there in 1755 when he married Mary Osborn. That he returned to Jersey to work in the family business is suggested by the use of his mark on a Jersey coffee pot of this period.
  • GAVEY, Jean. Jersey. Established by 1715, and therefore perhaps born not later than circa 1694. The mark ascribed to him remained in use until circa 1775, which suggests that his son Edouard, qv, may have continued with it. The influence of his son is likely seen in two coffee pots bearing his mark that are both well up to the quality of London pots of the day.
  • GENGE, JP, Jersey, see J POPE GENGE
  • GIRARD, Jean. Jersey. Son of a Hugeunot from Mont-Rouge, near Paris, who removed to Guernsey in 1572 and subsequently to Jersey, where Jean appears to have remained with his brother Pierre until returning to Paris after their father's death. He returned to Jersey about 1605, and is known there intermittently until 1651. He was working at Rennes in 1637, when his daughter Marie married Amyce de Carteret Seigneur of Trinity. A French wine cup makers mark MF survives at St John’s Church in Jersey bearing the inscription Don De Marie gerard veuue damis de Carteret Seigneur De la trinite a leglise de St Jean. Connections might be Noah Girard, jeweller of London, 1706-1708, Jacques-Pierre Siméon Girard, born 1736, and Pierre Girard, born 1765, both of whom became goldsmiths at Caen. However, Jacques-Pierre's parents were David Girard and Marie-Madeleine Fallet, linen-drapers of Caen, and the name is not an unusual one.
  • GODFREY, W. Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller and watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1852, he may be a son of the William Godfrey who plied the same trade at Plymouth in 1812-1833. Other members of this family are known to have worked at Plymouth in 1814-1829, and at Ottery St Mary, Devon, from 1873. W.Godfrey may have overmarked imported wares.
  • GORDON, Samuel. Jersey. A linen-draper who is known from an advertisement of 1786 to have imported silver buckles and cutlery from England for retail in his shop. Presumably one of a Scottish family, there were goldsmiths of this name in Madras and elsewhere in the Empire during this period.
  • le GOUPILLOT, Bienaimé A. Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have worked in 1839-1852, an antecedent is likely to have been the 18th century clockmaker F le Goupillot, of whom a brass-dialed long-case clock is known.
  • (le) GOUPILLOT, E. The Parade, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker known to have been working in 1835-1845, and possibly the same man as Mr le Goupillot, qv
  • (le) GOUPILLOT, John. Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have worked in 1839-1856. This man may be the son of John Goupillot, qv, as the Jersey Almanac of 1868 additionally lists the firm of watchmakers, Goupillot and Son of Beresford Street, St Helier. The Jersey Almanac of 1868 lists Goupillot and Son at 4 Queen Street, St Helier.
  • (le) GOUPILLOT, Mr. Jersey. A watch and clockmaker known to have been working in 1845, he is possibly the same man as E le Goupillot, qv.
An 1804 spoon by Jacques Quesnel and a pair, 1841, by Thomas de Gruchy and Jean Le Gallais of Jersey. The trio sold at Christie's in 2006 for £288
  • (de) GRUCHY, Jean I. Jersey. A clockmaker, of whom a clock dated 1763 is known. Goldsmith’s work formerly ascribed to this man is now given to Jean Gavey, but the possibility remains that he was a goldsmith, and that he was the father of John de Gruchy III, qv.
  • de GRUCHY, John II. London. The son of the Reverend Philip de Gruchy of Jersey, born circa 1744, he was apprenticed in 1758 to John Swift, goldsmith of London, as was Pierre Maingy, qv. His freedom is unrecorded, but was probably attained circa 1765. Whether or not he returned to Jersey at this point is unknown, but that he entered no mark at Goldsmiths' Hall suggests that he might have. By 1779 either he or John de Gruchy III, qv, went into partnership with Alexander Field of London, the two men entering a joint mark at Goldsmiths' Hall. By 1780 this partnership had dissolved, and the John de Gruchy of the partnership disappears from view. If he was John II, he would have been about 36 years old, and might have returned to Jersey.
  • de GRUCHY, John III. Oxford. The Parliamentary Return of 1773 lists a John de Gruchy junior at Oxford, who cannot be John II because John II's father's name was Philip, and who might therefore be a son of Jean I, the clockmaker. His mark is given in the return as IDG, in the Channel Islands style, so he may previously have worked in Jersey. He may also be the John de Gruchy later in partnership with Alexander Field (vidé supra), since that man is known to have been a smallworker, and the return shows the Oxford man as a goldworker.
  • de GRUCHY, Thomas. 2 Brook Street, St Helier, Jersey. Possibly the son of Matthew de Gruchy, clockmaker, born 1778, this man was established in business by 1822, having perhaps previously been in the employ of another firm. In 1831 he took John le Gallais, qv., perhaps previously his apprentice, into partnership. He died in 1846, his share in the business being taken up by John le Gallais. His family were involved in banking in 1817-1820
  • GUILLEMOTTE, Colas. Guernsey. Otherwise unrecorded, he was authorised by the island authorities in 1553 to strike coins, for which he would presumably have had to cut the dies. It seems improbable that anyone other than a goldsmith would have been competent to do this. Examples of what appear to be his coins were identified in the recent Castle Cornet excavations, and have also been found at Gorey.

H

  • HAMON, George I. Jersey. Apparently working from circa 1774, he is known to have purchased a shop in 1790. He was the father of George Hamon II, qv, and died in 1809/10. He is also known as a clockmaker and amateur seismologist. Hamon appears to have worked in other metals as the weather cock at St John’s Parish Church bears his mark and is dated 1774.
  • HAMON, George II. Jersey. Son of George Hamon I, qv., and probably his apprentice, he inherited his father's business in 1809/10 and is known still to have been working in 1834. E Hamon, a clockmaker at St Ouen circa 1820-1830, is likely to have been related.
  • HARDY, Guillaume. Guernsey. A name given in some older works to Guillaume Henry, qv.
  • HARVEY, Andrew. 20 Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked in 1839-1852, he is perhaps the father of the CA Harvey, watchmaker, known in 1891, and perhaps a son of John Harvey, watch and clockmaker of Weymouth, 1758-1829, and a relative of Bennett Harvey, silversmith and ironmonger of Weymouth, 1770-1820.
  • HÉBERT, Abraham, Jersey. Son of Abraham Hébert, a Frenchman, who died in 1666. He was established by 1684, when he supplied communion cups to Grouville, but is not recorded after 1700, when he married Elizabeth Valpy. He is perhaps one of an extensive goldsmithing family of Dieppe (1599-1789), though the name also appears amongst goldsmiths at Alençon, Le Mans, London, The Hague and Amsterdam. There may also be some connection with the Cartault family, qv. Jeanne Cartault, widow of Pierre Hébert, goldsmith of Dieppe, continued his business there in 1670, and Cartault was the maiden name of the mother of Moise Hébert, goldsmith of Dieppe in 1683.
A c1740 salver by Guillaume Henry of Guernsey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £3,360
  • HENRY, Guillaume. Guernsey. He appears to have been established by 1720, and died in 1767. Work bearing what is believed to be his mark is dated between 1735 and 1771, the latter instance showing that such dates are not a totally reliable indicator of a man's working life as his mark was obviously used after his death.
  • HENRY, Pierre. London. Son of Pierre Henry and Alice Fashin of Guernsey, he is known to have worked in London in 1670-1717, and is likely to have been apprenticed there. He was the brother-in-law of Nicholas Ozanne, qv. Mr Henry, goldsmith of London in 1745-1751 might be a descendant, and antecedents might be A Henry, goldsmith of Rouen in 1450, and Jean Henry, goldsmith of Rouen in1580.
  • HOCQUARD, John Edward. Jersey. A jeweller, optician and watch and clockmaker known in 1809. The firm continued after his death as it is lisetd at Grove Place, St Helier in the Jersey Almanac of 1888.
  • HOLINSHED, H. Jersey. Purchased the business of John le Gallais in 1874, selling it to Charles T.Maine in 1890. Since both men overstruck their marks on those of the makers of imported silverware, it is probable that Holinshed did likewise.
  • HOLLINSHED, Frederick. 35 King Street and 2 Brook Street, St Helier, Jersey. A silversmith and clockmaker working in 1877, whose name appears on the dial of a French clock then presented by the Jersey Eastern Railway Company. He is listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1888 as a silversmith. He presumably also marked imported watches and possibly overstruck silverware and is likely to beconnected with H Hollinshed.
  • HYATT, Mr. Ann Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1845. A John Hyatt, son of John Hyatt of Preston, Somerset is recorded, apprenticed to James Gould 1733 free 1741, he was in partnership with Charles Semore 1757 and is noted in 1773. Also an Edward Hyatt, watchmaker, is recorded at Newnham, Gloucestershire, in 1839, when his daughter was born, and a Lewis Hyett, watchmaker, worked at Gloucester in 1852-1857

I

  • IRELAND, Henry. 23 King Street in 1832 and Broad Street in 1845, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1845 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Probably the son of J. Ireland of Brideport c1800.
  • ISSACHAR, W. Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller and watch and clock maker, he traded in 1845-1852, probably largely retail. He may have overmarked imported goods.
  • JEAN L'ORFÈVRE, Guernsey. The earliest recorded goldsmith in the Channel Islands, he was murdered in or before 1309 by one John Dymoke, who took sanctuary in a church and abjured the realm, thus becoming an outlaw. Many of the country goldsmiths of this time are only known because they appear in legal records of this sort, which, considering few goldsmiths are likely to have found themselves in this position, give an extremely unbalanced sample of what must have been a very much more extensive craft.

K

  • KIRBY or KERBY, Francis. Broad Street, St Helier, Jersey. Probably the son and apprentice of John Kerby, qv., he is known to have worked in 1832-1853, as a clock and watch maker and silversmith, presumably having inherited his father's business. M Kerby, a clockmaker known in 1833, might be a brother.
  • KERBY, John. Jersey. Born in 1759 and presumably apprenticed locally, he was probably the father of Francis Kirby, and was still working circa 1830. He died in 1832.
c1770 trefid spoons by Thomas David Mauger and Lacques Limbour of Jersey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £264

L

  • le LACHEUR, John. Guernsey. A silversmith, jeweller, and watch and clock maker trading in 1874, he may be a successor to le Lacheur & Lenfeszty, watch and clockmakers, 1821-1860, and may have added goldsmiths' wares to the existing retail stock.
  • LAGARRIGUE, A. 12 Peter Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1868 Jersey Almanac as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker.
  • LEE, H. Seal Street and King Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 and 1845 Jersey Almanacs as silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Probably a member of the Devon family of watchmakers of the same name known 1844-1849
  • LESLIE, Edwin. 2 David Place, St Helier, Jersey. A retail jeweller and watch and clock maker trading in 1884-1917, he may have overmarked imported goods.
  • LIMBOUR, Jacques. Jersey. Established by 1770, probably having been apprenticed locally, this man appears to have worked until his death in 1791. He was the grandfather of Jacques Quesnel I, qv, and both men were successively the local librarians.
  • de la LONDE, Sebastian. 8 Broad Street, St Helier, Jersey. Born in France in 1806. A watch and clock maker who is known to have been working in 1852-1861 and listed in the 1856 Jersey Almanac as a silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. His son Gustave born 1839 is listed in the Jersey census of 1861 as a watchmaker as is his nephew Edouard Olivier born 1846 who was apprenticed to him as a watchmaker.

M

  • MAINE, Charles T. Jersey. A retail jeweller, optician, and watch and clock repairer, in 1890 he purchased the business of H.Holinshed, qv., formerly John le Gallais, qv., and continued the practice of overstriking his mark on other men's goods. The business continues in the same family.
  • MAINGY, Pierre. Guernsey. The son of Pierre Maingy, tailor, born circa 1718, he was apprenticed in 1732 to John Swift of London, qv. as was John de Gruchy of Jersey. There is no evidence that he completed his apprenticeship, but the quality of his work is evidence of his ability. He was establishedin business in Guernsey by 1755, by which time William Arnell, qv., was connected with him in some way. Dated pieces suggest that he remained in business until 1775. Though his master, John Swift, took two Channel Island apprentices, his biography shows no major connection with the islands, and his first acquaintance with an islander may have been with Jean Perchard, a fellow apprentice of William Paradise. In 1749 Swift supplied a platter now at St Aubin's, which may suggest some furtherconnection of which we are unaware.
  • MALLETT, John. 42 Don Strett, St Helier, Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller, optician and watch and clock maker, he traded in 1856-1924, probably largely as a retailer. His connection with Walter Mallett, qv, is obscure. Both men may be connected with John Mallett of Barnstaple, 1811-1850, the ancestor of the Bath and London firms. If so, they would have been related to the Upjohn family of West Country clockmakers, circa 1700-1900, and to Edward Bird, goldsmith of Bristol, 1784-1818. John Mallett may have overmarked imported goods.
  • MALLETT, Walter, Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller, and watch and clock maker, trading in 1884-1917, probably largely as a retailer. (Vidé supra). He may have overmarked imported goods.
  • MANSELL, Thomas. London. The son of William Mansell, merchant of Guernsey, born circa 1683, he was apprenticed in 1697 to Benjamin Pyne, goldsmith of London. There is no evidence that he completed his apprenticeship, and his subsequent fate is unknown. The mark previously ascribed to him cannot belong to him, as in one instance it is found struck over a London mark of 1784, by which time he would have been about 100 years old. A mark, TM struck twice and a Rose-head struck once on an early 18th century Trefid spoon engraved with the initials IAL may well be his mark.
  • MARCUS, R. 15 Windsor Road, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked in 1837-1875, he is presumably related to Benjamin Marcus, of Cheapside, St Helier, a clockmaker known in 1839-1852.
  • MARTIN. Halkett Place in 1843 and Broad Street in 1845, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 and 1845 Jersey Almanacs as a silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. Probably a descendant of J. Martin of Cullompton a watch and clock maker who married Jane Salter in 1775, and Edmund Martin a clockmaker from Puddletown 1738-1777. The firm continued in Devonshire until 1883.
A c1760 cream jug by Pierre Maingy of Guernsey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £1,800
  • MASSERAN. Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 and 1845 Jersey Almanacs as a silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker.
  • le MASURIER, Mr. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked in 1839.
  • MAUGER, Charles Martin. Jersey. A watchmaker known in 1810, he was perhaps one of the silversmithing family of this name.
  • MAUGER, George. Jersey. The son of Thomas David Mauger, qv., and Marie le Dain, he was born in 1750, and was probably apprenticed to his father. He married Marie Neel in 1776, but she perhaps died, for he appears also to have married Elizabeth Payn in 1778. He is last recorded in 1823. His second wife may have been related to Richard Payn and ED Payn, clockmakers working in Jersey circa 1820-1830, and may be connected with the goldsmithing family of this name at Rouen in 1557-1664.
  • MAUGER, Thomas David. Jersey. He married Marie le Dain, their son George Mauger being born in 1750 and succeeding them in business. Surviving examples of work ascribed to him suggest that he was working circa 1730-1796. A connection might be be Jean Mauger, medallist of Paris, 1648-1722. A Jean Gadois dit Mauger, Mogé or Maugé, 1686-1750, was a goldsmith in Quebec.
  • MESSERVY, Maximilian and François. Jersey. In 1641 these two men received a royal pardon for forging foreign gold and silver coins; pistoles and pieces-of-eight. Their occupation is unknown, but it seems unlikely that any islanders other than goldsmiths would have had the expertise to do this. It is possible that they later played some part in the Jersey Mint of 1646-1647. Maximilian was later executed.
  • MITCHELL, James. Jersey. In 1792 this man advertised himself as Watchmaker to the Prince of Wales. He was perhaps one of the Dorset clockmaking family of this name working circa 1700-1900, or of the probably connected Michell or Mitchell family of Devon and Somerset clockmakers, known circa 1670-1900. A Robert Michel, perhaps an earlier member of the same family, worked as a goldsmith at Marlborough in 1599-1616.
  • MOURIN or MORIN, Thomas. Jersey. This man was established in business by 1601, when he is known to have made two communion cups for St Martin's Parish, now lost. He is recorded in 1615, and may have died in 1628.

N

  • NAFTEL, Elizabeth. Guernsey. Daughter of Nicholas Blondell, qv., born 1731. She married Thomas Naftel and inherited her father's business by 1776, working with her sons Nicholas Andrew and Thomas Andrew, qv., largely as a watch and clock maker. She died in 1809.
  • NAFTEL, Nicholas Andrew. Guernsey. Son of Thomas and Elizabeth Naftel, qv., born in 1762 and apprenticed to his parents. He went to England, and is known to have borrowed clockmaking tools from Richard Gelks of Devizes, Wiltshire, in 1789. He married Mary Higham in England in 1789, and then returned to Guernsey to work with his mother and brother, adding sugar-trading with the West Indies to the family business. He left Guernsey in 1784. There is no evidence that he worked as a goldsmith, but the family firm is known to have made spoons and buckles from 1719.
  • NAFTEL, Thomas Andrew. Guernsey. Son of Thomas and Elizabeth Naftel, qv., born 1759 andapprenticed to his parents. In 1778/9 he went to London for a few months to improve his clockmaking, and he married Anna Jacobs at Fordingbridge, Hampshire, in 1792. She died, and he married Sophia Blondell, presumably a distant relation, in or before 1817. There is no direct evidence that he worked as a goldsmith, but a christening cup with TN overstruck on London marks might be his. He appears to have died in the 1820s, his son Paul Jacob, by Sophia Blondell, becoming a distinguished artist.
  • NATHAN, Mr. Jersey. This man advertised in 1786 that he would sell at The Duke of York silver watches, buckles, and jewellery. He is likely to have been a Jewish tradesman from one of the southern English ports, and may be the Philip Nathan of Portsmouth, silversmith and dealer in hats and gloves, whose trade card survives in the records of Goddards of Salisbury, or Benjamin Symonds Nathan of Plymouth, known in 1773. There were also a Solomon Nathan in Plymouth, 1797-1805, a Jacob Nathan at Stonehouse, 1800- 1836, and a Joseph Nathan in Weymouth, 1823.
  • NELSON, Mr. Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller and watch and clock maker known in 1832, he may have overmarked imported goods.
  • NICOLL, John. Exeter. Probably born at St Sampson's, Guernsey, circa 1407, he was apprenticed to Richard Furslond, goldsmith of Exeter, perhaps circa 1421, attaining freedom in 1428. He issubsequently unrecorded, but is not known to have returned to Guernsey. There were several Nichols in Exeter at this time, and the Exeter and Guernsey families may have been related.
  • NICOLLE, Edmund. 7 Beresford Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker and optician listed in the Jersey Almanacs of 1856 and 1868.

O

  • OLLIVIER, Thomas A. 1 Charring Cross, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker known to have worked in 1837-1875.
  • OURRY or OUVRY, Lewis. London. The son of Lewis Ourry, a Captain in the Jersey garrison, he was born circa 1717, and apprenticed in 1731 to Augustine Courtauld. He was free in 1740, and entered his mark at Goldsmiths' Hall, London, as a largeworker in that year. He is last recorded in London in 1742. His subsequent career is unknown, and it is possibly that he returned to Jersey. Augustine Courtauld, a Huguenot, was the son of Augustine Cortauld, merchant of Saint-Pierre d'Oléron, and had been taken to England as an infant, concealed in a basket of vegetables.
  • OZANNE, Nicholas. Guernsey. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Pierre Henry of La Haye du Puits, and was thus the brother-in-law of the goldsmith Pierre Henry, qv. Otherwise unrecorded as a goldsmith, he was left £30 tournois by his mother-in-law Alice Fashin in 1670, to make two silver cups.
A Guernsey christening cup c1800, by Jean Le Page. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £600

P

  • Le PAGE, Jean I. Guernsey. Perhaps the son and apprentice of Nicholas le Page, clockmaker, he was established by 1799, which date is borne by a christening cup bearing his mark, and was still trading in 1826. He was the father of Jean le Page II, qv.. He is perhaps a descendant of the Rouen goldsmithing family of this name, known 1552-1685.
  • Le PAGE, Jean II. Guernsey. The son and perhaps apprentice of Jean le Page I, he had established himself in business by 1826. The firm continued in the same family until the death of Miss le Page in the 1940s. There appears to be no way of distinguishing the son's marks from the father's.
  • PERCHARD, Jean. Guernsey. The son of John Perchard, mariner of Guernsey, he was born about 1706, and was apprenticed in 1720, after his father's death, to William Paradise, goldsmith of London, his elder brother Matthew, qv., being already in London. There is no record that he completed his apprenticeship, but he returned to Guernsey, worked there, and died in 1758. Paradise, despite his name, was not a Huguenot refugee, being the son of another William, a woollen-draper of Newbury. However, the family may have been connected with Claude Paradis, goldsmith of Paris, and his son Roland Paradis, 1696-1754, goldsmith of Quebec.
  • PERCHARD, Matthew. London. The son of John Perchard, mariner of Guernsey, born circa 1703, he was apprenticed in 1717 to Edward Holaday, goldsmith of London. Free in 1724, he swiftly attained office in the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, dying as Prime Warden in 1777. Three nephews, Peter, John and Peter, continued his London business, one becoming Lord Mayor of London. A descendant of one of these was perhaps James Perchard, goldsmith of London, 1808-1817, in partnership with William Brooks II, goldsmiths and jewellers. A Jerseyman of this name was a partner of James or John Guiton in the St Helier bank of Guiton and Perchard in 1821
  • PLUCK, Francis B. Jersey. A retail jeweller and watch and clock repairer trading in 1884-1924, he may have overmarked imported goods.
  • PLUMMER, Samuel. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1832.
  • POIGNAND, Hippolitus. Jersey? and Calcutta. His relationship to Pierre and Louis Poignand, qv, is obscure, but he was born, probably in Jersey, in 1761. He married in London in 1792, and arrived at Calcutta the following year, working as a silversmith until his death in 1805. His mark resembles those of many Jersey silversmiths, and he uses a dummy duty mark of George III’s head, which appears upon some Channel Island silver of the late 18th century. It is therefore possible that he was apprenticed in Jersey and worked there before 1792.
  • POIGNAND, Pierre. Jersey. The son of Louis Poignand, qv, and Elizabeth, daughter of Pierre Amiraux, qv, he was perhaps a partner in Poignand Fils, known in 1807. He had established his own business by 1809, and died in 1826. Elizabeth's sister Delicia married David Poignand, watchmaker, and emigrated with him to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1787.
  • POIGNAND, Louis. Jersey. The son of a Huguenot refugee from Poitiers who arrived in Jersey in 1733 and died in 1758. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Pierre Amiraux, qv.. He established himself as a clockmaker, and was still trading in 1781. He may also have worked as a goldsmith, and some of the early 18th century LP marks found in Jersey might be his. A relative, Jacques Poignand, from Caen, was godfather in 1746 to the daughter of Jacques Quesnel, qv.
  • POPE GENGE, J. Jersey. Known circa 1870, this man acquired the business of his brother-in-law George Bowring, qv., in 1884, selling out to Albert E Edgar, qv., in 1899. He overstruck his mark on those of the maker's of silverware imported from England, and Albert E Edgar continued this practice. There were Pope Viberts at Penzance in 1790-1865, and a Pope Durant at Torpoint, Cornwall, in 1873. These men perhaps had a maternal relation in common.
  • Le PORC, Jean. Jersey. Son of Thomas le Porc, he is known to have been working as a goldsmith in 1540.
  • du PORT, Jean-Pierre. Guernsey. Surviving pieces bearing his mark suggest that he was established in business during the 1770s. His premises burned down in 1788, his surviving stock being sold off at auction. He is known to have worked as a silversmith and ironmonger, perhaps retail only, for nearly all his silver consists of christening cups with English or older Guernsey marks which he overstruck with his own.
  • PYE, William. Southampton and Jersey? The son of William Pye, of Wimpson, Millbrook, Hampshire, he was born in 1670, and was apprenticed in 1683 to William Young of Southampton and Jersey. It is not known whether he accompanied his master to Jersey, and he is last recorded as marrying Sarah Herne at Baddesley, Hampshire, in 1693. The Pyes had previously been connected with the Channel Island community in Southampton, Suzanne Pye being buried at the French church there in the plague of 1665.
A c1740 beaker by Jacques Quesnel of Jersey. Sold at Christie's in 2006 for £1,200

Q

  • QUENAULT, Jean. Jersey. This name is given in older works to Jacques Quesnel, qv.
  • QUENOUILLERE, Adolphus. Jersey. A retail jeweller and watch and clock repairer trading in 1874-1917, he may have overmarked imported goods.
  • QUESNEL, Charles William. 9 Broad Street in 1832, 21 Broad Street in 1834 and 6 Broad Street in 1843, St Helier Jersey. Listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1843 as a silversmith watchmaker and jeweller. He retired between 1845-1850 an died in 1856, being buried at Green Street cemetery. He retailed imported clocks in addition to retailing silverware. He was either the son of Jacques I or of Michel Quesnel a clockmaker.
  • QUESNEL, Jacques I. Jersey. The grandson of Jacques Limbour, qv, he was probably apprenticed locally, and was established in business by 1781, when he supplied a flagon at Grouville. Father of Jacques Quesnel II, qv.. In 1791 he succeeded Jacques Limbour as Librarian, a post which he held until his death in 1821. His elder brother Michel was a clockmaker, in business by 1771.
  • QUESNEL, Jacques II. Jersey. The son and perhaps apprentice of Jacques Quesnel I, he succeeded to his business in 1821, dying in 1843.

R

  • RATHBONE, J. 24 Bath Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1868
  • RAY, John. Jersey. A retail jeweller, optician, and watch and clock- maker known to have worked in 1884-1927. He may have overmarked imported goods. He was perhaps one of the Shaftesbury and Wimborne Minster clockmaking family of this name, known in 1670-1862.
  • RICHARDS, Edmund. Guernsey. Born circa 1786, this man is known to have worked as watchmaker in 1806-1814, and may have been connected with William Richards, watchmaker of Poole, 1820-1830.
  • ROBILLARD, P. 5 Mulcaster Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1839-1843.
  • ROBILLIARD, Nicholas. Guernsey. A working jeweller and watchmaker known in 1874, this man was perhaps the antecedent of Walter Frank Robilliard, 1921-1927.
  • ROBINSON, John. London. The son of Henry Robinson of Guernsey, he was born circa 1696, and in 1710 was apprenticed to David Willaume, goldsmith of London. He was free in 1717, and is recorded in London until 1723, but several other men of this name at the time leave room for confusion. There is no evidence that he returned to Guernsey. David Willaume was the son of Adam Willaume or Villiamme, goldsmith of Metz, and had arrived in London by 1686, retiring about 1728.
  • ROGERS, T. 7 Regent Road, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1868.
  • ROWLAND, Christopher. Southampton and possibly Jersey. The son of Richard Rowland, goldsmith ofSouthampton, apprenticed to him in 1646, this man might possibly be the owner of the CR mark used in Jersey in the late 17th century. An antecedent may be Anthony Rowland, a lattener of Sherborne in 1524-1526, who is recorded to have been a Frenchman.
  • RUSSELL, Bruce. Guernsey. The firm of Bruce Russell and Son operating from Le Gron, St Saviour began production in 1974 and are the only surviving working silversmiths in the Channel Islands. They manufacture a range of silverware including presentation pieces. Bruce Russell and his son Simon are respectively the third and fourth generation of working silversmiths in this family.

S

  • SAINT, John James. London. Recorded in 1687-1724, he was Jean- Jacques Saint, son of Pierre Saint, qv, and grandson of Jacob Saint, goldsmith of Saint-Lô, 1630-1636. A Philippe Saint or Sainct, known in London in 1714-1730, may be a son, but he does not appear in the French genealogy of the family.
  • SAINT, Pierre. Jersey. A moneyer at the Saint-Lô mint in 1638, when he married Sarah Lesoudain, he was the son of Jacob Saint, goldsmith of Saint-Lô, who had preceded him as monneyer, and Anne Brunoy. The Saints were an extensive family of goldsmiths of Bayeux and Saint-Lô, working circa 1600-1800. A Huguenot, Pierre abjured at St Helier in 1687, having brought with him his wife, and their sons Jean, Jean-Pierre, and Jean-Jacques. Whether he remained in Jersey or continued to England is unknown, but his son Jean-Jacques became the London goldsmith John James Saint, qv.
  • SAMUEL, David. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have been working in 1832.
  • Le SCELLEUR, C. 42 Halkett Place, St Helier, Jersey. A watchmaker listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1868.
  • SEBIRE, P. Charing Cross, St Helier, Jersey. Listed in the 1843 Jersey Almanac as a silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker.
  • SIMON, Mr. Jersey. A silversmith, jeweller and watch and clock maker known in 1852. His wife and family are listed in the census of 1861 where his occupation is listed as silversmith, the family remained in Jersey until the mid 20th century. He is perhaps one of the family of that name trading in Bideford, Launceston and Helston in 1800-1856. He may have overmarked imported goods.
  • SMITH, James. 75 King Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked in 1839-1845, taking G Bensa, qv., into partnership in 1845. He appears to have retired by 1852, after which the business was continued by G Bensa, and expanded to include silversmith and jewellery work.

T

1857AdTaroni.jpg
  • TARONI. Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. Listed as a silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker in the Jersey Almanac of 1856, he is presumably of Italian origin.
  • THOREAU, James. Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked circa 1740-1794, this last date appearing on a long-case clock of his. The timespan suggests two generations.
  • TOUTAIN, J R. Jersey. A watch and clockmaker thought to have worked late in the 18th century. A Toutain or Toustain family of goldsmiths worked at Rouen circa 1362-1642, and at Exeter in 1522. The Exeter man is now known to have been born at Rouen.
  • TOUTAIN, Louis D. St Helier, Jersey. Known from 1832 and trading in Broad Street in 1853. Listed as a silversmith and watchmaker in the Jersey Almanacs of 1843 and 1868 where he is shown as trading at 14 Library Place.
  • TROUTAUD, Eugene. Guernsey. A working jeweller, watch and clock maker known in 1874-1901, becoming E H Troutaud and Sons in 1901.

V

  • VAUGHAN, Mr. Jersey. On the staff of Colonel Smyth, appointed by Sir Richard Vyvian to re-open the Truro mint in 1646, he found himself engraver to the Jersey mint of 1646-1647. He is likely to have been a goldsmith, as were the engravers at the Civil War mints of Exeter and probably Truro and Hereford. It is probable that he had to engrave the Jersey mint dies, because Vyvian's dies had been captured at Exeter. A Catholic, he is unlikely to have remained in Jersey after its conquest by Cromwellian forces in 1651, and appears to have gone to France with Colonel Smyth.
  • le VAVASEUR dit Durell, Philippe and Thomas. Jersey. See DURELL, Philippe and Thomas le Vavaseur dit.

W

  • WALDEN, John. Jersey. A retail jeweller, optician, and watch and clock maker, he traded from 1874-1927. He may have overmarked imported goods.
  • WALKER, J. Queen Street, St Helier, Jersey. A watch and clock maker known to have worked in 1839-1843. He is possibly the Josias Walker, watch and clock maker, known at Ottery St Mary, Devon, in 1783-1830, or a son.
  • WEBB, Peter. Guernsey? This man is suggested by H D Ellis as a Southampton goldsmith known in the 1680s although there appears little appears to support this attribution. If he existed he was perhaps a descendant of James Webb, goldsmith of Southampton, known 1569-1571. He may also have worked in Guernsey, a christening cup with his mark being known in Sark. Goldsmiths of this name, and presumably of the same family, also worked at Winchester in 1630-1727, and at Marlborough in 1689.
  • WESTBROOK, W. Jersey. A watchmaker known to have worked in 1845.
  • WHITE, G. 4 New Street, St Helier, Jersey, A watchmaker listed in the Jersey Almanac of 1868. Probably a descendant of Samuel White of Bideford and Torrington apprenticed in 1771, married 1781 and died 1837, the father of Samuel II a watchmaker and silversmith born 1793, married 1823 and died 1843.

Y

  • YOUNG, William. Southampton and Jersey. Son of William Young of Stoke, Southampton, he was apprenticed to John Thornburgh and free 1681. Johazza, wife of Mr William Young of St, Lawrence, goldsmith was buried at Holy Road in 1685 and a daughter of the same name was baptised in 1683. William Young is known to have worked in Jersey in 1688, when he supplied a platter to Grouville, and in 1693, when he was involved in a lawsuit over a silver cup stolen from him, and by which time he had bought or leased a house in St Helier. Whether he brought with him his apprentice William Pye qv Is unrecorded. Edward Young , goldsmith and banker of Bristol, might be connected, but it is likely that William Young was of French origin. Jefin Yon of La Nouvelle Ville, Caux married Francoise Obry of Dieppe at Southampton in 1581, and thereafter there are a number of Yons, of whom Mathieu was born in 1583, though upon his confirmation in 1600 he is Matthieu Yong, The initial connection with the Channel Islands might date from the 1606 marriage of Jean Robert of Guernsey to Sara de la Dune, widow of Robert Yon the father of Mattieu Yong. There is no trace of William in the registers of the French church, but he may have married out of the community, as did others, and become to that extent Anglicised.
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